7 hours ago    reblog   at 14:43    15572 NOTES    via joshpeck   © s-gellar
7 hours ago    reblog   at 14:43    97356 NOTES    via tai-kwon-joe   © phrux

James McAvoy fangirling over Patrick Stewart before shooting his first scene in X-Men: Days of Future Past

1 week ago    reblog   at 20:06    18305 NOTES    via ussdamnitjim   © mcavoyclub

1 week ago    reblog   at 20:05    32914 NOTES    via ussdamnitjim   © hobolunchbox
dmthx28:

when ur in ur lane and see someone swerve messily out of theirs

dmthx28:

when ur in ur lane and see someone swerve messily out of theirs

1 week ago    reblog   at 20:05    45651 NOTES    via yongmuney   © dmthx
wolf-food:

experimentsinmotion:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks
Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

sharks are trying to save us

wolf-food:

experimentsinmotion:

Nature vs. The Internet: How Google Protects Its Undersea Cables from Shark Attacks

Footage from a recent survey of Google’s undersea fiber-optic cables revealed that shark bites are a very real threat to global telecommunications. Indeed, a Google spokesperson noted that the company actually coats its cables in a Kevlar-like material to protect against sharks. Interestingly, sharks seem to have more of a taste for fiber-optic cables than the old-fashioned coaxial copper wires. A report from the United Nations Environment Programme and International Cable Protection Committee Ltd. speculates that sharks may be "encouraged by electromagnetic fields from a suspended cable strumming in currents." In other words, sharks, which can sense electromagnetic fields, may mistake the cables for live prey. The phenomenon highlights the ways in which technology and nature can intersect, and the strange new interconnections between the energy of the natural world and our man-made grids. 

sharks are trying to save us

1 week ago    reblog   at 20:05    4495 NOTES    via yongmuney   © theenergyissue

pleatedjeans:

mr. lovenstein | bonus panel

1 week ago    reblog   at 20:04    114338 NOTES    via joshpeck   © pleatedjeans

guy:

iconic

remyreaper:

amysfall:

we need a universal hand signal for “my parents don’t know about that”

image

1 week ago    reblog   at 14:58    763989 NOTES    via ussdamnitjim   © amysfall

klartie:

dad NO

1 week ago    reblog   at 14:58    643781 NOTES    via ussdamnitjim   © klartie